Legally Kidnapped

Shattering Your Child Welfare Delusions Since 2007


Sunday, November 18, 2018

Ignored for being 'MIDDLE CLASS': Social services dismissed child victims of UK's largest Asian grooming gang because they lived in homes with 'nice kitchens and conservatories', claims charity

Middle class victims of Britain's largest Asian child sex ring were ignored for 'not being poor enough' when social workers visited their 'nice' homes, claims charity chief.

Parents Against Child Explotation (Pace) have revealed that they believe the children were let down by social workers who thought that the children from wealthier families were 'rebelling', reports the Express.

More >> Ignored for being 'MIDDLE CLASS': Social services dismissed child victims of UK's largest Asian grooming gang because they lived in homes with 'nice kitchens and conservatories', claims charity

The Guardian’s investigation on children’s homes (Vulnerable children ‘auctioned online’ in care-home system, experts warn, 10 November) is hugely disturbing and grimly highlights why we must do better for our children. It is unacceptable for children to be treated in a way that deprives them of their dignity or fails to make their best interests paramount.

More >> Facing the problems with children’s homes

Report: PA Places Foster Children In Group Homes At Higher Rate Than Rest Of Country

Research released this week shows that, compared to the rest of the country, Pennsylvania is more likely to place foster youth in group homes and institutional care.

According to a new Annie E. Casey Foundation report, 47 percent of the state’s foster children aged 14 to 21 live in these facilities. The national rate for foster children of the same age is 34 percent.

More >> Report: PA Places Foster Children In Group Homes At Higher Rate Than Rest Of Country

‘We don’t bully children.’ — Watch Sen. Maggie Hassan grill Trump’s ICE nominee about detaining children

Saturday, November 17, 2018

At Cato Unbound: How Best To Reform Child Protective Services?

This month I’m participating in a Cato Unbound symposium on Child Protective Services and family rights. In its lead essay, attorney Diane Redleaf details some of the ways in which CPS agencies can arm-twist parents into so-called interim placements and safety plans that separate families with little or no judicial review.  Participant James G. Dwyer, in a response essay, takes a relatively positive view of the agencies’s work. My essay, by contrast, generally backs up Redleaf’s critique of CPS as a species of government enforcement agency gone wild: far too often, these agencies seize children from parents based on flimsy evidence, second-guess everyday parental behavior and decisions, or act on misguided Drug War zeal. 

More >> At Cato Unbound: How Best To Reform Child Protective Services?

HAULED TO COURT Mum accused of child abuse by social services over marks on baby’s face that were an allergic reaction to MILK

A MUM has been accused of child abuse over marks on her baby's face that were an allergic reaction to MILK.

Ashleigh Barden, 20, and her partner Jai Coates, 19, endured a "living nightmare" after a GP suspected marks on her daughter were bruising.


More >> HAULED TO COURT Mum accused of child abuse by social services over marks on baby’s face that were an allergic reaction to MILK

More than 14,000 immigrant children are in U.S. custody, an all-time high



The number of undocumented immigrant children in government custody has topped 14,000 for the first time, a rise that shows no signs of slowing as the Trump administration enforces policies that are keeping them in government facilities longer.

There were 14,056 unaccompanied immigrant minors in Department of Health and Human Services custody on Friday, according to a government source familiar with the number. A spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services confirmed that the total had reached approximately 14,000.

More >> More than 14,000 immigrant children are in U.S. custody, an all-time high

When schools use child protective services as a weapon against parents

Tiffany Banks sat in her living room, a ruby-red wall decorated with family photographs behind her, listing all the ways her life had unraveled over the past year. Her 6-year-old son had been removed from her care for more than a month. She was forced to close an in-home child care business, and she’d been temporarily displaced from her preschool teaching job, which she’d held for 17 years. Her teenage daughter refused to talk to the 6-year-old, blaming him for the family’s troubles.

More >> When schools use child protective services as a weapon against parents

Review places no blame on child welfare system in fatal dog attack on Clearwater infant



An internal review places no blame on investigators or case managers in a fatal dog attack on a 7-month-old girl while she was in foster care.

The Florida Department of Children and Families report also provides new details in the death Khloe Williams last month: the infant was in her car seat on a couch at the time of the attack and her foster grandmother called family members afterward before calling 911.

More >> Review places no blame on child welfare system in fatal dog attack on Clearwater infant

‘Twitter Mom’ gets her children back and declares victory over child and family services

A mother who went public on Twitter about trying to get her children back from foster care has reunited her family.

The woman, who cannot be named to protect the identity of her children, announced Friday the 11-year saga was over.

“All permanent wardship status are removed,” she said. “The supervision order which was in place has expired as of November 15, 2018.”

More >> ‘Twitter Mom’ gets her children back and declares victory over child and family services

Migrant Kids Survive Hardship To Reunite With Parents. Then What?


For nearly a month, the two sisters — then ages 17 and 12 — traveled by road from their home in El Salvador to the southern border of the United States. They had no parent or relatives with them on that difficult journey in the fall of 2016 — just a group of strangers and their smugglers.

Ericka and her younger sister Angeles started out in multiple cars, Ericka remembers. "In Mexico, it was buses. And we changed buses very often." (NPR is using only the sisters' middle names to protect their identity as they await a decision on their application for asylum in the U.S.)

More >> Migrant Kids Survive Hardship To Reunite With Parents. Then What?

Can Parents Lose Custody Over Legal Marijuana Use? Absolutely.

Scientific research confirms that most people who smoke marijuana before they have kids still occasionally get high after they become parents, and anecdotal research confirms that THC can make pushing a stroller through the park chill as hell. It is also a relatively safe stimulant in that if parents don’t hide it effectively — it’s really not that hard, get a kid-proof container — marijuana poses no serious medical risk to children.

But for parents in the throesw of a divorce, moderate, responsible, and even legal pot use represents a very real hazard. Despite shifting cultural and legal norms, marijuana consumption can and does come up in custody negotiations.

More >> Can Parents Lose Custody Over Legal Marijuana Use? Absolutely.

‘We are making these children homeless’: Kansas is harming foster kids, lawsuit says

Foster children in Kansas are shuffled between homes and facilities so much — in one boy’s case, more than 130 placements in six years — that youth can be rendered “homeless while in state custody,” a lawsuit filed Friday alleges.

More >> ‘We are making these children homeless’: Kansas is harming foster kids, lawsuit says

DCFS steps up monitoring, discharges at psychiatric hospital after ACLU threatens court battle

Facing legal pressure, the state’s beleaguered child welfare agency said Friday that it will station staff around the clock inside an Uptown psychiatric hospital to monitor young patients until they can be safely removed in the wake of rising hotline complaints alleging physical and sexual abuse.

More >> DCFS steps up monitoring, discharges at psychiatric hospital after ACLU threatens court battle

Poverty Isn’t Neglect, But the State Took My Children Anyway

As I write this, I’m sitting in a small, humid room in Plantation, Florida. I’m from Seattle, and I know almost nobody in this area, but I can’t leave. That’s because my three- and four-year-old daughters were taken from me by the state last April. Until that case is overturned, or my parental rights are restored, this is where I’ll stay.

More >> Poverty Isn’t Neglect, But the State Took My Children Anyway

North Dakota prepares for overhaul of federal foster care funding

The North Dakota foster care system is set to undergo some major changes.

The Family First Prevention Services Act, included in the Bipartisan Budget Act that President Donald Trump signed into law in February, aims to keep children with parents or relatives rather than in the foster care system and provides additional funding for prevention services.

More >> North Dakota prepares for overhaul of federal foster care funding

In Kashmir, child abuse in orphanages is rampant

Six children’s schools-cum-orphanages have been closed in the Kashmir valley in the last few months owing to a lack of proper facilities. In Kashmir, these orphanages and seminaries are mostly run by religious people. The Juvenile Justice Act lays down some of the rules for the functioning of these orphanages and their inmates include juvenile delinquents, while some children come from single-parent families who send them to these homes for the free meals and education.

More >> In Kashmir, child abuse in orphanages is rampant

Clark County OKs settlement with mother of raped foster child

Ashley’s son celebrated his 12th birthday last month, but to his mother it sometimes seems like he is so much older.

The boy, once outgoing, is now quiet and reserved to the point that his teachers bring it up to his mother, Ashley.

More >> Clark County OKs settlement with mother of raped foster child

Friday, November 16, 2018

Kansas Is Sued Over Foster Care That’s Bounced Several Children Between 100 Homes

A lawsuit filed Friday contends Kansas violates foster children’s civil rights by moving them too often, adding to their trauma and restricting their access to necessary mental health treatment.

The National Center for Youth Law, Children’s Rights and Kansas Appleseed filed the suit against Gov. Jeff Colyer and the heads of the Department for Children and Families, the Department for Aging and Disability Services and the Department of Health and Environment.

More >> Kansas Is Sued Over Foster Care That’s Bounced Several Children Between 100 Homes

Report Finds Foster Kids Shortchanged

Too many foster youth in Michigan struggle in their transitions to adulthood, trying to go to school, get a job, and find a place to live, according to a new report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Bobby Dorigo Jones, with the nonprofit Michigan’s Children, says that many young people, especially children of color, get bounced around in foster homes. He tells us that disrupts their relationships with family, friends, and counselors, and can make it harder to graduate from high school.

More >> Report Finds Foster Kids Shortchanged

8-Year-Old Bronx Boy With PTSD, Anxiety Runs Away From Foster Mom Before Storm: NYPD



An 8-year-old Bronx boy reported missing after running away from his foster mom after leaving a hospital appointment Thursday has been found safe, police say.

Kareem Morris was leaving an appointment at Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx when he ran away from his foster mom, police said. The boy suffers from PTSD as well as anxiety, and officials were worried the severe weather conditions would hinder his discovery.

More >> 8-Year-Old Bronx Boy With PTSD, Anxiety Runs Away From Foster Mom Before Storm: NYPD

Families First Preventative Care Act aims to reduce the number of children in foster care

Every year, North Dakota sees about a 6 percent increase in the number of children in foster care, according to the Department of Human Services. The Families First Preventative Care Act was passed to cut that number back.

The Act was passed in February by the federal government and moves funding from treatment to preventative care.

More >> Families First Preventative Care Act aims to reduce the number of children in foster care

When Families Un-Adopt a Child

Between 1 and 5 percent of U.S. adoptions get legally dissolved each year. Some children are put up for “second-chance adoptions.”

More >> When Families Un-Adopt a Child

Arizona youth aging out of foster care missing out on services

Numerous services are available to young people aging out of foster care in Arizona, but only a fraction of the intended recipients are taking advantage.

More >> Arizona youth aging out of foster care missing out on services

Team 10: California department does not maintain data on all foster care deaths

A 10News investigation has revealed that the California department responsible for the state’s child welfare program does not maintain data regarding all deaths of children in foster care.  The revelation is prompting calls for immediate action to child welfare services from at least one San Diego-based politician.

More >> Team 10: California department does not maintain data on all foster care deaths

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