Legally Kidnapped

Shattering Your Child Welfare Delusions Since 2007


Sunday, December 09, 2018

No change to how Child Protective Services handles parent marijuana use

While recreational marijuana is now legal in Michigan, many legal questions still surround it, like how its use will be viewed by Child Protection Services.

Michigan Department of Health and Human Service Public Information Officer Bob Wheaton said the new law doesn't change how CPS will handle marijuana use by parents.

More >> No change to how Child Protective Services handles parent marijuana use

Aberdeen social worker thrown out of profession after failing to protect a child

A social worker has been thrown out of the profession after he failed to protect a child

More >> Aberdeen social worker thrown out of profession after failing to protect a child

Report highlights the trauma that thousands of Texas families have experienced with family incarceration

With more than 200,000 people in Texas jails and prisons, and nearly half a million children in Texas who have experienced a parent getting locked up, a new national report highlighted something Texas families are well aware of: family incarceration leads to potentially devastating emotional and financial effects.

Half of American adults — 113 million people in the country — have had a family member incarcerated, according to the report, which was released Thursday by the bipartisan advocacy and policy organization FWD.us and Cornell University.

More >> Report highlights the trauma that thousands of Texas families have experienced with family incarceration

Home-Schooling Parent In Worcester Was Arrested In Her Home. Now She's Suing

A lawsuit filed last week alleges that the Worcester School Committee and the city's superintendent, as well as the state Department of Children and Families, violated the constitutional rights of a woman and a son she was home schooling.

The lawsuit alleges that police knocked on Josilyn Goodall's door on March 30, saying her son had missed so much school that they were there to confirm the 8-year-old boy — called "A.S." in the suit — was "living and breathing."

More >> Home-Schooling Parent In Worcester Was Arrested In Her Home. Now She's Suing

DCF Secretary Says New Foster Care Agreements Increase Oversight and Costs

The top child welfare official in Kansas says bringing in additional contractors under a new series of grants will cost more but will help put the troubled foster care system on solid footing.

Department for Children and Families Secretary Gina Meier-Hummel says the cost will rise $35 million per year. Kansas will have more contractors and she says that will make it easier to serve the more than 7,000 kids in foster care.

More >> DCF Secretary Says New Foster Care Agreements Increase Oversight and Costs

Saturday, December 08, 2018

Death of a unicorn: Couple endures emotional crime in bizarre botched adoption

Cruelty has no boundaries, no depth, no shape.

When it is practiced by someone who doesn’t care about the consequences of their actions, cruelty can continue past the point of understanding. In the age of social media and smartphone connectivity, vulnerable people, like the kind who adopt babies, too often have to rely on the perceived kindness of strangers to fulfill their dreams.

More >> Death of a unicorn: Couple endures emotional crime in bizarre botched adoption

Outrage Intensifies Over Claims Of Gene-Edited Babies

Ever since a Chinese scientist rocked the world by claiming he had created gene-edited twin girls, international outrage has only intensified.

"Everything that's emerged over the last week only adds to the concern about this having been a deeply unfortunate, misguided misadventure of the most dramatic sort," says Francis Collins, director of the U.S. National Institutes of Health. "It was shocking at the time. A week later, it's still shocking."

More >> Outrage Intensifies Over Claims Of Gene-Edited Babies

Caregivers for 3600 migrant teens lack complete abuse checks

Nearly every adult working with children in the U.S. — from nannies to teachers to coaches — has undergone state screenings to ensure they have no proven history of abusing or neglecting kids. One exception: thousands of workers at two federal detention facilities holding 3,600 migrant teens in the government's care, The Associated Press has learned.

The staff isn't being screened for child abuse and neglect at a Miami-based emergency detention center because Florida law bans any outside employer from reviewing information in its child welfare system. Until recently at another facility holding migrant teens in Tornillo, Texas, staff hadn't even undergone FBI fingerprint checks, let alone child welfare screenings, a government report found.

More >> Caregivers for 3600 migrant teens lack complete abuse checks

Lawsuit: NYPD forced woman to give birth in handcuffs

A lawsuit is claiming the New York Police Department forced a woman to give birth while shackled in handcuffs.

In a lawsuit filed Thursday, the woman she says she went into labor in February in a police holding cell in the Bronx. She says police took her to Montefiore Medical Center where they handcuffed her wrists to the bed and shackled her ankles.

More >> Lawsuit: NYPD forced woman to give birth in handcuffs




Grandparents’ challenge to adoption too late

Grandparents’ objections to an order terminating a father’s parental rights and an adoption order came too late, and their motion for permission to review the adoption file was properly denied by the court for confidentiality reasons. Background The Middlesex Department of Social Services placed children with adoptive parents on April 20, 2016, after the father’s parental rights ...

More >> Grandparents’ challenge to adoption too late

Social worker brutally gunned down in driveway

The fatal shooting of a 45-year-old female social worker has left her family, friends and the townspeople shocked and baffled.

In an incident that occurred at Makhado Park in Louis Trichardt, a social worker at the Louis Trichardt Memorial Hospital, Ms Thinavhuyo Muzila, was shot multiple times and killed upon arriving home last Friday at about 21:30. Muzila was parking her vehicle, intending to enter the house, when unknown suspects emerged and shot her, killing her instantly.

More >> Social worker brutally gunned down in driveway

She Ran Away From Foster Care. She Ended Up in Handcuffs and Leg Irons.

Nevayah still remembers the feel of the handcuffs. They were foreign to her; she had never been in trouble.

A latecomer to New York City’s foster care system, Nevayah had been signed over to the Administration for Children’s Services when she was 16. Rather than enter a group home, she told her caseworker she would prefer to live with her mother in Ohio. Eager to start school, she bought a bus ticket, made it to Cleveland and phoned the agency to let them know that she was safe.

More >> She Ran Away From Foster Care. She Ended Up in Handcuffs and Leg Irons.

Abducted Harrison child found safe, parents arrested

A baby believed to be in danger after being abducted by his troubled biological parents has been located and is safe, officials said Friday.

The endangered missing child advisory was canceled. The child's biological parents and two others were arrested.

More >> Abducted Harrison child found safe, parents arrested

Family says it reported charged daycare worker to state a year before arrest

After a daycare worker in McKinney was charged by police for injuring three children, one family told WFAA that it reported that same worker a year ago after their child came home with bruises and scratches.

Jessica Joy Wiese, a former employee at the Joyous Montessori school, now faces an injury to a child charge and was booked into the Collin County Jail on Tuesday.

More >> Family says it reported charged daycare worker to state a year before arrest

For N.Y.’s Foster Children, Running Away Can Lead to Handcuffs

Nevayah still remembers the feel of the handcuffs. They were foreign to her; she had never been in trouble.

A latecomer to New York City’s foster care system, Nevayah had been signed over to the Administration for Children’s Services when she was 16. Rather than enter a group home, she told her caseworker she would prefer to live with her mother in Ohio. Eager to start school, she bought a bus ticket, made it to Cleveland and phoned the agency to let them know that she was safe.

More >> For N.Y.’s Foster Children, Running Away Can Lead to Handcuffs

How the state is using technology to keep social workers safe

Social workers across Georgia can sometimes face hostile, threatening and dangerous incidents and behavior when working in the field.

On Monday, the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services went live with a phased rollout of a new security system by distributing to child-welfare investigators and case managers “panic buttons” that connect to the Click Safe mobile phone application.

More >> How the state is using technology to keep social workers safe

Friday, December 07, 2018

Social worker axed for failing to protect child who was ‘allowed to visit crack den with their dad’

A social worker has been thrown out of the profession after he failed to protect a child who was “being allowed to visit a crack den with their father.”

More >> Social worker axed for failing to protect child who was ‘allowed to visit crack den with their dad’

Fractured care system ill-equipped to deal with abuse at Halifax orphanage: report

A new report from an ongoing public inquiry into decades of abuse at a Halifax-area orphanage says a fragmented system of care wasn't equipped to address the needs of children who were vulnerable.

The interim report, released Friday by the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children Restorative Inquiry, says the story of the home illustrates a social system that works in isolation.

More >> Fractured care system ill-equipped to deal with abuse at Halifax orphanage: report

Facebook post re-unites siblings separated by adoption

A Coquitlam man has found a half-sister he didn’t even know he had — and it’s all thanks to social media.

Six months after Rychelle Clairmont-Dipalo posted on Facebook looking for her half-brother who was given up for adoption as a baby, her dream has come true. Shaun Bons, 39, was scrolling through Facebook when he saw the post, which had his birth date and birthplace, and thought ‘what are the odds.’

More >> Facebook post re-unites siblings separated by adoption

Judge's order didn't end family separations at border

The Trump administration separated 81 migrant children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border since the June executive order that stopped the general practice amid a crackdown on illegal crossings, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press.

More >> Family separations at border down, but dozens still affected

Home is where the heart is, for missing foster kids, too

According to data compiled by the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, there were 121 foster children statewide listed as AWOL, Absent Without Leave in November.

More >> Home is where the heart is, for missing foster kids, too

Nearly 90 Texas children died in day care over the last decade, Statesman reports

More than 450 others were sexually abused, according to the Austin newspaper's investigation of the state's oversight of childcare facilities. Gov. Greg Abbott's spokesman said lawmakers should address the issue next year.

More >> Nearly 90 Texas children died in day care over the last decade, Statesman reports

Judge orders phone visits for father, son in custody battle

A judge ordered parents embroiled in an interstate custody battle to begin the process of setting up telephone visits between the father in Massachusetts and the child, who lives with his mother in Normal, after consultation with the boy's counselor.

In his first hearing after being appointed to the case, Judge Charles Feeney told lawyers for Michael Cadena and Amber Buck on Wednesday that he expects progress in the case that started four years ago when Cadena filed for custody of Mikey, now 4.

More >> Judge orders phone visits for father, son in custody battle

Black and white children more likely to be in care than Asian children

Black children are nearly four times more likely to be in care than Asian children, while white children are nearly three times more likely, research has found.

A study by the Child Welfare Inequalities Project, which was funded by the Nuffield Foundation and involved researchers at seven universities, looked at 8,000 children in care in England, across a representative sample of 18 local authorities.

More >> Black and white children more likely to be in care than Asian children

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