Legally Kidnapped

Shattering Your Child Welfare Delusions Since 2007


Saturday, November 17, 2018

Clark County OKs settlement with mother of raped foster child

Ashley’s son celebrated his 12th birthday last month, but to his mother it sometimes seems like he is so much older.

The boy, once outgoing, is now quiet and reserved to the point that his teachers bring it up to his mother, Ashley.

More >> Clark County OKs settlement with mother of raped foster child

Friday, November 16, 2018

Kansas Is Sued Over Foster Care That’s Bounced Several Children Between 100 Homes

A lawsuit filed Friday contends Kansas violates foster children’s civil rights by moving them too often, adding to their trauma and restricting their access to necessary mental health treatment.

The National Center for Youth Law, Children’s Rights and Kansas Appleseed filed the suit against Gov. Jeff Colyer and the heads of the Department for Children and Families, the Department for Aging and Disability Services and the Department of Health and Environment.

More >> Kansas Is Sued Over Foster Care That’s Bounced Several Children Between 100 Homes

Report Finds Foster Kids Shortchanged

Too many foster youth in Michigan struggle in their transitions to adulthood, trying to go to school, get a job, and find a place to live, according to a new report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Bobby Dorigo Jones, with the nonprofit Michigan’s Children, says that many young people, especially children of color, get bounced around in foster homes. He tells us that disrupts their relationships with family, friends, and counselors, and can make it harder to graduate from high school.

More >> Report Finds Foster Kids Shortchanged

8-Year-Old Bronx Boy With PTSD, Anxiety Runs Away From Foster Mom Before Storm: NYPD



An 8-year-old Bronx boy reported missing after running away from his foster mom after leaving a hospital appointment Thursday has been found safe, police say.

Kareem Morris was leaving an appointment at Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx when he ran away from his foster mom, police said. The boy suffers from PTSD as well as anxiety, and officials were worried the severe weather conditions would hinder his discovery.

More >> 8-Year-Old Bronx Boy With PTSD, Anxiety Runs Away From Foster Mom Before Storm: NYPD

Families First Preventative Care Act aims to reduce the number of children in foster care

Every year, North Dakota sees about a 6 percent increase in the number of children in foster care, according to the Department of Human Services. The Families First Preventative Care Act was passed to cut that number back.

The Act was passed in February by the federal government and moves funding from treatment to preventative care.

More >> Families First Preventative Care Act aims to reduce the number of children in foster care

When Families Un-Adopt a Child

Between 1 and 5 percent of U.S. adoptions get legally dissolved each year. Some children are put up for “second-chance adoptions.”

More >> When Families Un-Adopt a Child

Arizona youth aging out of foster care missing out on services

Numerous services are available to young people aging out of foster care in Arizona, but only a fraction of the intended recipients are taking advantage.

More >> Arizona youth aging out of foster care missing out on services

Team 10: California department does not maintain data on all foster care deaths

A 10News investigation has revealed that the California department responsible for the state’s child welfare program does not maintain data regarding all deaths of children in foster care.  The revelation is prompting calls for immediate action to child welfare services from at least one San Diego-based politician.

More >> Team 10: California department does not maintain data on all foster care deaths

Teen allegedly ripped off by social worker ‘hurt,’ ‘angry’

A victim of a Kelowna social worker accused of stealing thousands of dollars from vulnerable children in care wants justice.

Lawsuits filed in B.C. Supreme Court on behalf of two youths allege the social worker took financial benefits from children in care.

More >> Teen allegedly ripped off by social worker ‘hurt,’ ‘angry’

Pregnant woman accused of scamming couples by promising adoption



Christina Bay, 34, collected more than $14,000 from one couple after signing an agreement to give them her child, then collected nearly $4,000 from another couple, Daytona Beach police said.

More >> Pregnant woman accused of scamming couples by promising adoption

Foster homes investigated 7 times within a year but Ontario didn’t close them until Tammy Keeash died: court documents

There were at least seven investigations that verified child protection concerns into a company operating three foster homes in Thunder Bay before the Ontario government shut them down in the weeks following the death of Tammy Keeash in May 2017, Nation to Nation has uncovered.

The 17-year-old’s body was found in a Thunder Bay waterway two months after she was placed in one of the three homes owned at the time by Johnson Children’s Services.

More >> Foster homes investigated 7 times within a year but Ontario didn’t close them until Tammy Keeash died: court documents

Man who helped in parental kidnapping seeks to delay prison

A Virginia businessman convicted of helping in a parental kidnapping is asking the nation’s highest court to suspend the start of his prison term while he appeals.

The request to the U.S. Supreme Court, which the government opposes, comes three weeks before Philip Zodhiates (zoh-dee-AH’-tehs), of Waynesboro, is scheduled to begin a three-year prison term in Kentucky.

More >> Man who helped in parental kidnapping seeks to delay prison

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Hotel owner paid cop to leave blindfolded foster kid in his ‘sex dungeon,’ CT police say



It started in October, when Connecticut police say they noticed a person with the email “daddydomboss@baymontct.com” was looking to do a “casting couch interview” with a young Mexican girl.

Now, police have arrested 46-year-old Simon Hessler, whom they accused of trying to purchase an underage foster child so he could have “limitless sex” with her in his “sex dungeon” that he had set up in a trailer near the hotel he owns, according to Fox61.

More >> Hotel owner paid cop to leave blindfolded foster kid in his ‘sex dungeon,’ CT police say

Adoption of children from foster care: National Child Welfare Hypocrisy Day, 2018

The real agenda of most child welfare systems, and most of the people in them, is made apparent every year on National Adoption Day; or, as it should properly be called, National Child Welfare Hypocrisy Day.

More >> Adoption of children from foster care: National Child Welfare Hypocrisy Day, 2018
Four former employees of the county’s social services filed a complaint against the department and members of the board of supervisors in Pittsylvania County Circuit Court on Tuesday.

More >> Former employees file lawsuit against county DSS

Protesters say NSW adoption laws will create another 'stolen generation'

Opponents of the NSW government's planned changes to adoption laws are holding a snap protest outside state parliament ahead of an expected vote.

More >> Protesters say NSW adoption laws will create another 'stolen generation'

Kids in Raeford psych center abused, fed so little ‘your stomach will shrink,’ report says

Less than a week after the 9-year-old boy arrived at the Hoke County psychiatric center, the bruises and abrasions started to spread across his body, state documents show.

Before he left Canyon Hills Treatment Facility roughly two weeks later, the boy says, a staff member grabbed him by the shoulder, rubbed spit across his face and kicked him in the groin.

More >> Kids in Raeford psych center abused, fed so little ‘your stomach will shrink,’ report says

Children of the Incarcerated Face Multiple Traumas: Study

Children whose parents are incarcerated are the “invisible victims of mass incarceration,” and judges and corrections authorities need to pay special attention to the emotional trauma and financial burdens they encounter, argues a new paper in the Maryland Law Review.

Amy B. Cyphert, author of the study, and a lecturer at the West Virginia University College of Law Lecturer, said research offered several pathways that provided a “ray of hope” for young people when one or both parents was behind bars.

More >> Children of the Incarcerated Face Multiple Traumas: Study

Family First will help kids, but Kansas must act

As a pediatrician, I see the ongoing crisis in our state’s child welfare system firsthand.

Two siblings I cared for in my clinic lived with foster parents in Kansas City, 2 1/2 hours away from their biological family. They entered foster care because their birth mother is struggling with a substance use disorder and can’t safely care for them without treatment. Their foster parents are dedicated and loving people, but did not have proper support from our state’s underfunded child welfare system. Unfortunately, this disconnect meant a lack of medical history and prescription information that I needed to help these children, which further fragmented their care.

More >> Family First will help kids, but Kansas must act

The government pays for migrant children’s lawyers. Challenge the government, and they can lose their funding

The U.S. refugee agency that cares for children who have crossed the border alone has for years threatened to cut off funding to legal advocates if they challenge a child’s detention or placement in juvenile jails, according to attorneys who have worked within the system.

Without legal help to protest the government’s decisions, many migrant children end up separated from their families for longer, languishing in detention without an avenue for appeal.

More >> The government pays for migrant children’s lawyers. Challenge the government, and they can lose their funding

'R ua virgin': Details released of CPS worker's arrest for seeking out child for sex


Details of what led to the arrest of a Child Protective Services employee from Saginaw in September were released this week.

Adrian Anthony Martinez, 44 , is charged in federal court with enticement of a child.

More >> 'R ua virgin': Details released of CPS worker's arrest for seeking out child for sex

I’m Adopted, But I Won’t Be Celebrating National Adoption Month

Everyone asks me ― an adoptee ― what I’m doing to celebrate National Adoption Awareness Month. As if I should rejoice each November because I’m so “lucky” to have been adopted.

But to me, this month feels like being at a wild party and losing something in the crowd. You try calling for help ― asking others to join in your search ― but the music and festivities drown out your voice. Your interruption is not only unwanted; it is unacknowledged. This party is not for you.

The name itself irks me. National Adoption Awareness Month. I don’t believe our country is generally unaware of adoption. The practice has been happening everywhere in various forms since ancient times. America’s first modern adoption law dates back to the 19th century. Today people seem well versed in the popular “rescuer and rescued” adoption narrative. We don’t need a month, week or day to celebrate this.

More >> I’m Adopted, But I Won’t Be Celebrating National Adoption Month

Report Shows Ohio Foster Children Have Problems Transitioning Into Adulthood

New research by the non-partisan Annie E. Casey foundation shows Ohio youths in foster care have a difficult time transitioning into adulthood.

More >> Report Shows Ohio Foster Children Have Problems Transitioning Into Adulthood

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Report: AZ Kids Need Support as They Age Out of Foster Care

A study out this week looks at challenges faced by foster children in Arizona and across the country, when they turn 18 and "age out" of the system.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation data found that overall, young people transitioning from foster care are falling behind others in completing high school, finding jobs and acquiring basic life skills.

More >> Report: AZ Kids Need Support as They Age Out of Foster Care

Protest Punishment: Baby taken away from foster dad after arrest outside ICE facility


A South Florida foster father says fighting for what he believes in left him fighting to get his foster daughter back. 7’s Brian Entin has our special report, “Protest Punishment.”

Back in July, protesters were at the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention center in Pompano Beach, upset about the U.S. policy separating immigrant children from their parents.

More >> Protest Punishment: Baby taken away from foster dad after arrest outside ICE facility

Study sheds light on obstacles foster children face as they age out of system

A study released Tuesday sheds light on the struggles Indiana's foster children face as they get older. The numbers reveal the impact moving around throughout the formative years can have on foster youth's long-term success and the additional support that may be required for them.

The comprehensive data delves into the experiences of teens who are close to aging out of the child welfare system. According to the findings, individuals who spend years in foster care tend to lag behind when it comes to getting their high school diploma, finishing college or getting a job.

More >> Study sheds light on obstacles foster children face as they age out of system

Foster Kids In Pennsylvania Residential Facilities Aren’t Getting An Education

Young people in foster care across Pennsylvania — and the country — say that being sent to residential facilities often plunges them deeper into academic trouble instead of getting them on track. Schedules are filled with electives like movement therapy, art therapy and “values.” Worksheet- and computer-based education proliferate. The schools too often operate like educational black holes, failing to help kids earn relevant credits. Students complain of being kept on campus when they could be attending neighborhood schools. And government oversight is lacking.

More >> Foster Kids In Pennsylvania Residential Facilities Aren’t Getting An Education

Data Reveals an Unstable Road for Indiana Foster Youth

New research uncovers the instability faced by Indiana youth in foster care, and the resulting negative outcomes experienced during their transition to adulthood.

Fostering Youth Transitions, a data brief released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, showed that moving in and out of foster care placements, unstable placement settings, and leaving foster care without finding a permanent family can create barriers to well-being for young people. Brent Kent, president and CEO with the foster youth advocacy organization Indiana Connected By 25, said that includes difficulties securing education, employment and housing.

More >> Data Reveals an Unstable Road for Indiana Foster Youth

Youth in Ohio foster care face more placements, barriers to adulthood

Youth age 14 and older in Ohio’s child wefare system experience more foster placements — which can be disruptive and traumatic — than those in other states, a new report shows.

Compared to a nationwide average, those in Ohio are 8 percent more likely to be moved more frequently, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation report released Tuesday.

More >> Youth in Ohio foster care face more placements, barriers to adulthood

Hillsborough Foster Kids sleeping in offices

One year after an anonymous tipster first told 8 On Your Side that foster kids were sleeping in cars in a Tampa gas station parking lot, some of then are still sleeping in foster care offices in Hillsborough County.

Eckerd Connects reports that ten foster kids slept in offices so far this month, 13 last month and 20 in September. Altogether it’s something that’s happened  to foster kids 86 times since September. Eckerd says sometimes kids refuse offered placements, other times there is no place to send them.

More >> Hillsborough Foster Kids sleeping in offices

Protest expected over NSW adoption changes

Hundreds of people are expected to protest outside NSW parliament over planned changes to the state's adoption laws.

The Berejiklian government is proposing to streamline the process of granting the guardianship of children or adopting them out.

More >> Protest expected over NSW adoption changes

Protect Your Parental Rights When CPS Investigates



There’s nothing quite like the adrenaline rush and flood of shame that hits when you open the door to find someone from Child Protective Services (CPS) on your doorstep. It’s horrifying. It’s embarrassing. You immediately start to remember every CPS horror story you’ve ever heard and you begin to worry. Since more parents are experiencing a visit from CPS than ever before, and since sometimes those visits have resulted in the quick removal of children – despite no grounds to allegations of harm or abuse – it is critically important for every parent to have a good idea of how to respond to a CPS visit.

More >> Protect Your Parental Rights When CPS Investigates

New York mother fighting son's chemotherapy ordered to turn over custody to temporary custodian

The mother of the boy who has been fighting to have her son removed from court-ordered chemotherapy treatment will now have to turn her son over to a temporary custodian.

Candace Gundersen of Huntington, New York has been fighting to regain custody of her son Nicholas Gundersen, 13, from Suffolk County Child Protective Services.

More >> New York mother fighting son's chemotherapy ordered to turn over custody to temporary custodian

Northamptonshire County Council: Children in care 'at risk'

A troubled council has been told young people in its care are at "potential risk" due to pressures on staff.

A letter from Ofsted to the chief executive of Northamptonshire County Council said that social workers are "overwhelmed" and "drowning".

More >> Northamptonshire County Council: Children in care 'at risk'

Young People in All 50 States Struggle While Transitioning from Foster Care to Adulthood, New Data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation Reveal



The Annie E. Casey Foundation today released Fostering Youth Transitions, a data brief highlighting the most comprehensive data set ever collected across all 50 states to assess how young people fare as they transition from foster care to adulthood.

More >> Young People in All 50 States Struggle While Transitioning from Foster Care to Adulthood, New Data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation Reveal

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Pa.'s Black youth more likely to be in, stay in foster care: Report

Compared to the rest of the nation, Pennsylvania’s African-American youth age 14 and older are more likely to experience foster care than youth in other states, according to a new report.

Approximately 43 percent of Black youths in Pennsylvania were in foster care in 2016, compared to 28 percent in the U.S., according to the report from the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a private philanthropy organization devoted to improving the lives of children and their families. And 33 percent of youths ages 14 and older were in foster care in the state, compared with 25 percent across the U.S.

More >> Pa.'s Black youth more likely to be in, stay in foster care: Report

Pre-Trial Hearing For Richardson Man Charged With Capital Murder Death of Adopted Daughter



Back in the news today, a pre-trial hearing for a Richardson man charged with capital murder in the death of his adopted 3-year old daughter last year.

Wesley Mathews initially reported his daughter Sherin missing on last October 7th, saying that he had made her stand outside their home because she refused to drink her milk.

More >> Pre-Trial Hearing For Richardson Man Charged With Capital Murder Death of Adopted Daughter

‘Troubling and regressive’: Indigenous peak bodies condemn changes to NSW Adoption Act

In a deeply troubling and regressive move, the NSW government will this week consider legislation that would allow for the forced adoption of Aboriginal children.

The proposed amendment to the Adoption Act 2000 would remove the requirement for consent of a child’s parent/s to adoption where applications are made by the child’s guardian.


More >> ‘Troubling and regressive’: Indigenous peak bodies condemn changes to NSW Adoption Act

Exam ordered for man accused of attack in welfare office

A judge has ordered a mental competency examination for a 19-year-old man charged with sexually assaulting a girl in a child welfare office.

Michael Anthony Hamer is charged in Johnson County with rape and aggravated indecent liberties with a child.

More >> Exam ordered for man accused of attack in welfare office

Baby forcibly removed from breastfeeding mother by gardaí and social workers

A baby girl was just a day old when she was forcibly removed from her breastfeeding mother at a maternity hospital by gardaí and social workers on foot of an emergency District Court order, the High Court has heard.

The circumstances of the removal caused “huge trauma” to the mother, baby and the professionals involved, Pól Ó Murchú, solicitor for the mother, said in a sworn statement.

More >> Baby forcibly removed from breastfeeding mother by gardaí and social workers

Report Finds Ohio Kids More Likely To Repeat Time In Foster Care

Child welfare advocates say a new study released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, offers the most comprehensive data ever collected across all 50 states about young people in the foster care system and their transition to adulthood.

"In a lot of ways, Ohio mimics the national data, so as a country we all have a long way to go to ensure permanancy for young people, to make sure they have forever families," said Brandi Slaughter, CEO of the advocacy group Voices for Ohio's Children.

More >> Report Finds Ohio Kids More Likely To Repeat Time In Foster Care

Ithaca is first to declare itself a 'free range kid city'

Parents in Ithaca, New York, can now let their kids play freely without fear of being punished for it. The city has just declared itself a "free range kid city, where kids have a right to unsupervised time and parents have the right to grant it to them."

This is a big step forward in a country where seeing an unaccompanied child can lead to calls to police, disturbing investigations by Child and Family Services, and well-meaning parents facing charges of negligence for letting their kids walk down the street alone.

More >> Ithaca is first to declare itself a 'free range kid city'

Human rights lawyer sceptical about expansion of inquiry into child abuse in state care

The Government has announced it is expanding the scope of its long-promised inquiry into the abuse of children in state care to include those in the care of churches.

Human Rights lawyer Sonya Cooper is sceptical about the expansion, however.

More >> Human rights lawyer sceptical about expansion of inquiry into child abuse in state care

NSW Groups Fear Second Stolen Generation Over Adoption Reforms




Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander legal and community groups fear a bill reforming child protection and adoption laws in New South Wales will sever Indigenous children's connection to culture, and result in a second stolen generation.

More >> NSW Groups Fear Second Stolen Generation Over Adoption Reforms

Issues in DCFS' handling of Aniya Day-Garrett case also cited in prior cases

Many of the same issues that plagued county social workers’ handling of the case of Aniya Day-Garrett, the four-year-old girl who was allegedly murdered by her mother and mother’s boyfriend in March, were also prevalent in two other high-profile cases, according to state reports obtained by News 5.

Those issues cited by state investigators included the failure to complete safety assessments in a timely fashion, as well as a lack of face-to-face contact with children who were allegedly abused.

More >> Issues in DCFS' handling of Aniya Day-Garrett case also cited in prior cases

Monday, November 12, 2018

UN experts concerned over racial bias in Dutch child welfare system

In May, police took the children into care, including a breastfeeding infant – reportedly without “duly considering their best interests, preserving the family structure or first providing instructions on how to combat problems in the home,” the experts said.

“This family separation has caused immense trauma and psychological damage and we are deeply troubled about the impact on the children’s physical and mental wellbeing,” said E. Tendayi Achiume, Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and Michal Balcerzak, Chairperson of the Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent.

More >> UN experts concerned over racial bias in Dutch child welfare system

Preparation for Family First Prevention Services Act Implementation

Earlier this year, Congress passed the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA), taking an important step toward better supporting the well-being of infants and toddlers in the child welfare system.

For the first time, FFPSA allows funds previously only available for foster care payments to be used to keep families together. In July 2018, the Department of Health and Human Services requested public comment on the development of a clearinghouse of prevention programs that can be implemented with FFPSA funding. ZERO TO THREE submitted comments on the comprehensive approach of our Safe Babies Court Teams in meeting the needs of individual families through integrated services.

More >> Preparation for Family First Prevention Services Act Implementation

New taskforce set up to help protect social workers from abuse

A new taskforce has been set up to help protect social workers in Northern Ireland from violence and abuse after nine out of 10 staff said they had been intimidated.

A recent report by the British Association of Social Workers NI (BASW NI) highlighted the scale of the problem, suggesting that three-quarters of their staff had received threats and half had been subject to physical violence.

More >> New taskforce set up to help protect social workers from abuse

State Performance Audit Finds Michigan Child Protective Services Failed To Start & Complete Investigations On Time

A state performance audit found that Michigan’s child protective services (CPS) failed to commence and complete some investigations on time. Investigators are to commence an investigation within 24 hours, and are to complete the investigation typically within 30 days. About 17% of investigations did not commence within 24 hours. Nearly 30% of reviewed investigations were not completed within required timeframes; these investigations were completed 44 days late on average, with the delays ranging from one day to eight months late.

More >> State Performance Audit Finds Michigan Child Protective Services Failed To Start & Complete Investigations On Time

Tusla chief's email to staff ahead of McCabe report's release: 'We can weather this storm'

THE HEAD OF child and family agency Tusla has warned staff, via email, to expect “further adverse media and political commentary for the agency” this week.

It comes ahead of the publication today of a report sparked by the agency’s handling of a file pertaining to claims made against Garda Sergeant Maurice McCabe. The probe by health watchdog Hiqa was ordered in spring of last year by Children’s Minister Katherine Zappone.

More >> Tusla chief's email to staff ahead of McCabe report's release: 'We can weather this storm'

Editorial: Oregon continues to fail foster children

A state audit found in January that Oregon’s child welfare system was so disorganized and inconsistent that it was putting some of the state’s most vulnerable children at risk.

Millions were misspent. Lawsuits forced the state to pay out other millions for failure to protect children. And the audit said the agency’s response to problems was slow, indecisive and inadequate.

More >> Editorial: Oregon continues to fail foster children

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Girl claims molested, abused at Temerloh welfare home

A resident of a private welfare home and orphanage in Temerloh lodged a police report claiming to be molested and abused by the centre’s staff last week.

The 10-year-old girl claimed to have been summoned by a male staff of the centre to his room at 2pm on Saturday, and was asked to lay on her back before being molested.

More >> Girl claims molested, abused at Temerloh welfare home

Tusla worker's phone was used to send journalist death threats

THE PHONE WHICH was used to send death threats to a journalist belongs to a Tusla staff member, TheJournal.ie can reveal.

The child and family agency has told TheJournal.ie that it does not condone “the use or threat of violence in any circumstances”, that it is reviewing the allegations and that it will “cooperate fully” with a Garda investigation into the matter.

More >> Tusla worker's phone was used to send journalist death threats

Center offers help to parents facing child abuse claims

When Michelle Weidner and her husband were accused of fracturing their son’s skull in 2010, the family’s life turned upside down until a second opinion determined a blurred line in a CT scan was not a fracture, clearing the Weidners of allegations of abuse.

The experience of being wrongfully accused led Weidner to her current post as executive director of the newly-formed Family Justice Resource Center in Peoria. The nonprofit group works with families accused of child abuse and neglect to connect them with doctors and other experts who may be able to provide an explanation for what authorities claim is abuse.

More >> Center offers help to parents facing child abuse claims

Group calls for investigation after Texas judge releases defendants after election loss

The American Civil Liberties Union of Texas asked the state judicial commission to investigate the actions of a Harris County judge who released youthful offenders after they promised not to kill anyone on Wednesday — a day after he lost an election, a report said.

“It is improper for a judge to make orders motivated by partisan interests or spite as a result of his political loss,” Sharon Watkins Jones, director of political strategies for the ACLU of Texas said in a statement, Patch Houston reported.

More >> Group calls for investigation after Texas judge releases defendants after election loss

Ministry responds to allegations that social worker stole from kids in government care

The Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) says a Kelowna social worker accused of stealing money from teens in government care is no longer a public employee.

More >> Ministry responds to allegations that social worker stole from kids in government care

McClure: Texas should act to safeguard foster children

A federal appeals court has ruled that Texas must hire more state workers to protect foster children, yet it overruled the lower court mandate that Texas increase the number of much-needed foster care homes.

Hank Whitman, Commissioner of Child Protective Services, testified to the Texas House last week that the Legislature’s approval last session to significantly increase salaries and hire more caseworkers succeeded in reducing turnover.

More >> McClure: Texas should act to safeguard foster children

Her toddlers contracted an STD while in foster care

While the Hancock County Sheriff’s Office was occupied with a forgery complaint leveled against state child-services workers in 2015, Bay St. Louis attorney Edward Gibson met with a client whose two children had been sexually abused and infected with gonorrhea while in state custody.

The client, Alexandria Faye, said she received a text message on June 11, 2014, from a Mississippi Department of Human Services worker urging her to come to a hospital in Gulfport.

More >> Her toddlers contracted an STD while in foster care

Judge Humke temporarily suspended pending charges for allegedly mishandling cases



Washoe County Family Court Judge David Humke was temporarily suspended after he was again accused of mishandling child support and custody cases within in his department.

Humke, who’s served on the bench for about three-and-a-half years, was suspended with pay last week pending formal charges from the Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline.

More >> Judge Humke temporarily suspended pending charges for allegedly mishandling cases

Foster kids in Washington deserve better

I worked in public child welfare in two states for more than 30 years, including 26 years in Washington as a caseworker, supervisor, area administrator and regional administrator. I have been director of a child-welfare training and research entity at the University of Washington School of Social Work and have done large amounts of training.

During most of those years, there were periodic discussions of the foster care crisis, along with persistent efforts to reform the system through legislation, class-action lawsuits and settlement agreements.

More >> Foster kids in Washington deserve better

5 siblings missing from northern California foster home found safe 80 miles away

Five siblings who ran away from their foster home in northern California have been found safe.
KPIX reported the children, who range in age from 4 to 16 years old, were found at a hotel in El Cerrito, California on Wednesday. Authorities stated the children first went missing from the temporary foster home on Nov. 3 in Stockton 80 miles away.
More >> 5 siblings missing from northern California foster home found safe 80 miles away

How Schools For Kids In Foster Care Act As ‘Educational Black Holes’

Back when he still lived with his family, when school was across the street from his home in West Philadelphia, Johnathan Hamilton used to plow through reading assignments and research religious questions online. He stumbled over fractions — math was always a struggle — but started getting into philosophy as an early teen.

Then, at 15, his relationship with his parents grew violent, and Hamilton went to live in a city shelter for foster youth. When a bed became available at a residential facility in suburban Glenmoore, Pennsylvania, run by the nonprofit Devereux Foundation, Hamilton was sent to live there. For roughly nine months, he went to school on the grounds of the facility — and he says it was mostly lost time.

More >> How Schools For Kids In Foster Care Act As ‘Educational Black Holes’

Saturday, November 10, 2018

171 kids from separated families still in custody, Most won't be reunited with parents


There are still 171 children from separated families in US custody more than four months after a judge ordered the US government to reunite the undocumented immigrant families it had split up at the border, according to court documents filed Thursday.

Of the children who remain in custody, there are seven who are in the pipeline to reunite with their parents in their countries of origin, according to the court documents, and six who the US government is working to discharge to parents in the US.

More >> 171 kids from separated families still in custody, Most won't be reunited with parents

Teen being forced to undergo chemo released to family friend



A Suffolk Family Court judge on Friday delivered a setback in the case of a 13-year-old who’s being forced to undergo chemotherapy, stripping his mother of custody and releasing him to a friend who must continue the therapy.

Nick Gundersen is in remission from mixed phenotype acute leukemia and has been undergoing court-mandated chemotherapy at NYU Winthrop Hospital since Oct. 30. He was released to a family friend in Huntington, where he will continue outpatient treatment.

More >> Teen being forced to undergo chemo released to family friend

Foster parent arrested for allegedly burning, injuring boy in Fredericksburg, police say

Authorities arrested a 33-year-old man accused of burning and injuring a boy who was in foster care and living with him in Fredericksburg.

Eric L. Woods was arrested on one count of child abuse causing injury. He was later released on bond, according to police.

More >> Foster parent arrested for allegedly burning, injuring boy in Fredericksburg, police say

Lawsuit challenges Alabama’s method of electing judges

A trial has begun in a lawsuit challenging Alabama's practice of electing appellate judges by statewide vote, a method that plaintiffs say results in all-white courts in a state where one in four people is African-American.

The trial began this week in federal court in Montgomery and is expected to last several more days.

More >> Lawsuit challenges Alabama’s method of electing judges

Judge orders largest sanctions ever against CPS for lying to remove kids



"This is by far the largest sanction I've ever been a part of or ever heard of being imposed against CPS," said attorney Dennis Slate.

More >> Judge orders largest sanctions ever against CPS for lying to remove kids

Trump administration weakens birth control requirement under ACA

Two rules issued Wednesday by the Trump administration will give some employers the opportunity to seek an exemption when it comes to providing contraception coverage for their employees.

Under the Affordable Care Act, employer-provided health insurance plans are required to cover birth control as a preventive service.

More >> Trump administration weakens birth control requirement under ACA

Lawsuit against DCF worker in Sheldon case dismissed

The Vermont Supreme Court ruled Friday that a mandated reporter does not have to report something that has already been reported.

The court threw out a lawsuit against Nicholas Ruggiero, an administrative reviewer for the Vermont Department of Children and Families, by Willis Sheldon, father of the late Dezirae Sheldon.

More >> Lawsuit against DCF worker in Sheldon case dismissed

Fredericksburg foster parent arrested for abuse

A Fredericksburg man was arrested Thursday after being accused of intentionally burning his 5-year-old foster son.

Eric Lamont Woods, 33, is charged with felony child abuse. He turned himself in at the Fredericksburg Police Department Thursday and was released on a personal recognizance bond.

More >> Fredericksburg foster parent arrested for abuse

As foster care numbers surge, relative caregivers get short shrift

Today, the federal government released new data showing that foster care numbers have risen for the fifth straight year in a row – up to nearly 443,000, an 11.5 percent increase from 2012 when the surge began. 

While people will immediately ask why foster care rates care are their highest since 2009; another very important question needs to be asked: Where are all those children living?

More >> As foster care numbers surge, relative caregivers get short shrift

Implement the Family First Prevention Services Act



More than 400,00 children are in foster care across the United States, and most are children of color. This number will only increase because of the current opioid crisis in the country. According to sciencedirect.com, we spend approximately $20,000 a month for a child to be placed in foster care, but we refuse to support families with concrete resources and services to prevent placing children in foster care.

More >> Implement the Family First Prevention Services Act

Former employee files 'whistleblower' lawsuit against Judge Holderfield

Alleging unlawful workplace harassment, verbal abuse and official misconduct, former Warren Circuit Family Court Administrator Leslie Warden Carr has filed a civil lawsuit against Warren Circuit Family Court Judge Catherine Holderfield and the judicial branch of the Kentucky Administrative Office of the Courts.

The lawsuit, filed Nov. 2, is pursuant to Kentucky’s “Whistle Blower Act” that provides protection from reprisal or retaliation to public employees who disclose suspected violations of any laws or regulations or suspected mismanagement, waste, fraud or abuse of authority.

More >> Former employee files 'whistleblower' lawsuit against Judge Holderfield

Friday, November 09, 2018

Computer glitch leaves Colorado caseworkers without child safety info for nearly 16 hours

For nearly 16 hours from Wednesday night into Thursday, caseworkers in El Paso County and elsewhere in Colorado couldn’t access child safety information on abuse and neglect reports due to a glitch in the state’s revamped case management system.

The lapse made more than 900 child welfare assessments inaccessible to county staff until just before noon Thursday, said Kristina Iodice, a spokeswoman for the county Department of Human Services.

More >> Computer glitch leaves Colorado caseworkers without child safety info for nearly 16 hours

Two missing teens ran away from social workers in Anderson County, sheriff's office says

Deputies with the Anderson County Sheriff's Office are searching for two missing teenagers who ran away from social workers in separate incidents.

One of the boys ran away Wednesday and the other ran away Oct. 26. The Anderson County Sheriff's Office posted information about the teens on the agency's Facebook page late Thursday afternoon, asking for the public's help to find them.

More >> Two missing teens ran away from social workers in Anderson County, sheriff's office says

mmigrant Children Are Being Detained For Months. Their Families Decided To Sue.

On Tuesday night, lawyers filed a lawsuit on behalf of seven immigrant youth and their families who claim the Trump administration is detaining children for an egregious amount of time.

Most of the young plaintiffs, who range from ages 11 to 17, have been stuck in children’s shelters or foster care facilities for between four and six months, despite having family members who have applied to be their sponsors.

More >> Immigrant Children Are Being Detained For Months. Their Families Decided To Sue.

Grandparents raising grandchildren push for more state support

The state counts more than 6,000 kids across Texas who have been removed from their homes and are now being raised by grandparents.

The Trouble Shooters find out what’s being done on both the grassroots and state levels to help these families.

More >> Grandparents raising grandchildren push for more state support

Child Welfare translator stabbed on home visit in Brooklyn

A child welfare translator was stabbed in the chest Thursday night in Brooklyn while on a work visit to the home of a 61-year-old man, cops said.

More >> Child Welfare translator stabbed on home visit in Brooklyn

State Supreme Court rules against Department of Social and Health Services in abuse case

Five girls in the Washington state foster care system were placed in the home of Scott and Drew Ann Hamrick, then adopted by the Eatonville couple between 1998 and 2003. In that time, the Hamricks abused them physically, sexually and psychologically.

The state Department of Social and Health Services, however, had no idea the abuse occurred. They approved and even encouraged the children to stay in their care.


More >> State Supreme Court rules against Department of Social and Health Services in abuse case

Ontario couple forced to return daughter to Nigerian orphanage because Canada refused to help

Erin and John Nymann from Cambridge, Ont., love their six-year-old daughter, Favour.

But because of months of government inaction and a bureaucratic process immigration lawyers call “redundant,” the couple was forced to return their daughter to the Nigerian orphanage where they adopted her nearly four months ago. Now the Nymanns are back in Canada, without their daughter, desperately pleading for someone to help them bring their little girl home.

More >> Ontario couple forced to return daughter to Nigerian orphanage because Canada refused to help

Texas judge orders rare $127,000 sanction against CPS after wrongful removal of children

A Harris County judge today announced what may be the largest-ever sanctions against Child Protective Services, forcing the state to come up with new training for its workers and pay more than $127,000 for wrongfully removing a couple’s children and allegedly lying to the court about it.

Now, attorneys for parents Melissa and Dillon Bright are calling for the firing of the CPS workers involved and asking for prosecutors to investigate and consider criminal charges.

More >> Texas judge orders rare $127,000 sanction against CPS after wrongful removal of children

Foster Care Numbers Up for Fifth Straight Year, Federal Data Released Today Shows

The number of youth in foster care in America rose for a fifth consecutive year in 2017, according to a federal report released today, though state data obtained by The Chronicle of Social Change suggests that the total may have plateaued or even decreased this year.

The annual report of the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS), which draws data on youth in foster care from each state, found 442,995 youth living in foster care as of September 30, 2017. That total is 6,444 above last year’s AFCARS report, a 1.5 percent increase from 2016 and an 11.6 percent increase from 2012.

More >> Foster Care Numbers Up for Fifth Straight Year, Federal Data Released Today Shows

Thursday, November 08, 2018

Promise not to kill anyone? After losing election, TX judge wholesale releases juvenile defendants

After losing his bench in a Democratic sweep, Harris County Juvenile Court Judge Glenn Devlin released nearly all of the youthful defendants that appeared in front him on Wednesday morning, simply asking the kids whether they planned to kill anyone before letting them go.

More >> Promise not to kill anyone? After losing election, TX judge wholesale releases juvenile defendants

Foster home abuse report imminent

The report of an independent review into the abuse of three children while staying in a foster home in Galway is scheduled for the end of this month.

Minister for Children Katherine Zappone said the report was expected after continued delays by the national review panel into the care of and situations surrounding the abuse of the children in care.

More >> Foster home abuse report imminent

Parents denied time with dying baby because of social worker failings

The Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman said the mother and father of a seriously ill baby were unable to spend quality time with him at a time when “their world must have felt like it was falling apart” because council social workers failed to review the case.

The baby died after spending nine weeks in hospital.

More >> Parents denied time with dying baby because of social worker failings

Utah nurse charged with murdering 2-year-old foster son



A Duchesne County nurse was charged Wednesday with murdering her 2-year-old foster son who investigators say she didn't want to adopt.

Lisa Jo Vanderlinden, 41, of Neola, is charged in 8th District Court with aggravated murder, a first-degree felony.

More >> Utah nurse charged with murdering 2-year-old foster son

Huntsville Woman Sentenced For Adoption Fraud



A Huntsville woman who defrauded a couple who wanted to adopt her unborn child was given jail time, 10 years probation and ordered to pay about $13,000 in restitution.

Meryann Lomae, 34, pleaded guilty Tuesday (Nov. 6) in Benton County Circuit Court to defrauding a prospective adoptive parent.
More >> Huntsville Woman Sentenced For Adoption Fraud

Delaware mom wanted for not turning over custody of girl, 4

Authorities looking for a 4-year-old Delaware girl have issued an arrest warrant for her mother.

WDEL-FM cites a Delaware State Police release that says a family court issued an order granting custody of Aliyah Fassett to the Division of Family Services on Oct. 16. Police say her mother, 37-year-old Andrea Brickhouse, refused to comply with requests to meet with caseworkers and turn over custody.

More >> Delaware mom wanted for not turning over custody of girl, 4

Judge slams Kent social services bosses for putting baby boy into foster care while grandparents who could have looked after him hadn't even been told he had been born

Council social services bosses have come under fire from a family court judge after a little boy was placed with foster carers when grandparents who might have offered a home were unaware he had been born.

Judge Mary Lazarus has complained about a 'wide-ranging composite set of failings' by staff at Kent County Council.

More >> Judge slams Kent social services bosses for putting baby boy into foster care while grandparents who could have looked after him hadn't even been told he had been born

NSW government to introduce forced adoptions bill

About 100 people joined a snap protest outside New South Wales Parliament on November 7 to oppose the state Coalition government’s attempt to amend the NSW Adoption Act 2000 and allow for a new generation of forced adoptions.

Speakers warned the proposed changes would institutionalise forced adoptions and raise the rate of Aboriginal and poor children being stolen from their families. 

More >> NSW government to introduce forced adoptions bill

Social services under fire after boy placed into foster care before grandparents knew he was born

A family court judge has criticised a council's social services department after it emerged that a little boy was placed with foster carers when grandparents who might have offered a home were unaware of his existence.

Judge Mary Lazarus complained about a "wide-ranging composite set of failings" by staff at Kent County Council.

More >> Social services under fire after boy placed into foster care before grandparents knew he was born

Why Trump's America Makes Me Regret Adopting My Daughters



Our daughters came home from China more than a decade ago. The first time their tiny feet touched American soil, we made a big deal of it. We were so happy about everything they’d inherit as newly minted Americans—our already head-over-heels love for them, every opportunity we could afford, and freedom from China’s oppressive government and its controversial (and now somewhat lifted) one-child policy. The same policy that was, most likely, the very reason they were available to join our family half a world away.

More >> Why Trump's America Makes Me Regret Adopting My Daughters

Change to Manitoba's child apprehension laws ensures kids can't be taken solely because of poverty

Manitoba's child apprehension laws are to be amended so that no child can be seized solely because of poverty.

NDP MLA Bernadette Smith introduced the bill to amend the Child and Family Services Act. After it passed a third reading on Tuesday, she called it a game changer and said it will support families and keep kids out of care.

More >> Change to Manitoba's child apprehension laws ensures kids can't be taken solely because of poverty

Wednesday, November 07, 2018

Cleveland siblings found safe after running from foster parent’s car

A Cleveland brother and sister who jumped out of their foster parent’s car and ran away were found safe Wednesday morning, police said.

The 11-year-old boy and 9-year-old girl are now in the custody of the Cuyahoga County Department of Children and Family Services, police said.

More >> Cleveland siblings found safe after running from foster parent’s car

Another stolen generation: Aboriginal groups slam adoption proposal

Adoption laws proposed by the Berejiklian government risk creating another stolen generation, Aboriginal organisations and legal advocates warn.

The government is putting forward changes designed to streamline the granting of guardianship of children and help fast-track permanent adoption.

More >> Another stolen generation: Aboriginal groups slam adoption proposal

Cherokee leaders speak out against Texas adoption ruling

A recent court ruling in Texas has Native American tribes across the country — including the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians — concerned about threats to their status as sovereign nations.

The ruling, handed down by U.S. District Judge Reed O’Conner, concluded that the 1978 law governing child welfare actions in Indian Country is race-based and therefore unconstitutional. It had previously been seen as a law based on tribes’ political — not racial — status.

More >> Cherokee leaders speak out against Texas adoption ruling

'Dawnland' documents untold story of Native American child removal in the U.S.

“Dawnland,” a documentary which will begin streaming Nov. 6, follows the first government-endorsed truth and reconciliation commission in the U.S. as Maine investigates the devastating impacts of Native American child removal.

“Dawnland” is premiering on the PBS series Independent Lens, as part of November Native American Heritage Month programming.

More >> 'Dawnland' documents untold story of Native American child removal in the U.S.

Foster-care girl (10) tells police she dropped baby then 'stamped on his head to stop him crying'

A 10-year-old girl charged with killing a six-month-old baby boy told investigators she panicked after dropping the infant, and stamped on the child's head to stop the crying, a sheriff in Wisconsin said.

Handcuffed and wearing a leather restraint around her waist, the girl sobbed as she appeared in Chippewa County Circuit Court. A judge set bond at $50,000 (€44,000). State law requires the case, at least initially, to be held in adult court.

More >> Foster-care girl (10) tells police she dropped baby then 'stamped on his head to stop him crying'

Five siblings missing after running away from foster home in California



Five brothers and sisters ran away from their foster home in Stockton, Calif., police said on Monday.

They were last seen on Saturday at noon; investigators say they fled the foster home with most of their belongings. The two youngest are 4 years old. The oldest is 16.

More >> Five siblings missing after running away from foster home in California

Lawsuit accuses B.C. social worker of stealing from vulnerable First Nations teens

A proposed class action lawsuit has been filed against a B.C. social worker accused of abusing his position by siphoning funds from the bank account of a vulnerable First Nations teenager.

The B.C. Supreme Court notice of civil claim accuses Robert Riley Saunders of moving the girl from a stable home into an independent living situation that would see her collect money from the Ministry of Children and Family Development.

More >> Lawsuit accuses B.C. social worker of stealing from vulnerable First Nations teens

Man Arrested In Death Of 17-Month-Old Foster Child

Authorities in the southwest metro say a man was arrested Tuesday in connection to the death of a 17-month-old foster child in his care.

The Scott County Sheriff’s Office says 30-year-old Jason Robert Betlach, of Jordan, was taken into custody by sheriff’s deputies and booked into the county jail on suspicion of second-degree homicide.

More >> Man Arrested In Death Of 17-Month-Old Foster Child

Philly’s foster-care discrimination case goes to federal appeals court

Philadelphia's Department of Human Services was back in court Tuesday, defending its refusal to contract with a Catholic foster-care agency that won't work with LGBTQ parents. The city has said Catholic Social Services is in violation of its fair-practices ordinance, which prohibits city contractors from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation.

A federal judge in July ruled in favor of the city, denying the provider's petition for its contract to be reinstated. Catholic Social Services argued that by its being sidelined, children in need of homes have been put at risk, and that forcing the agency to work with same-sex couples violated its religious freedom.

More >> Philly’s foster-care discrimination case goes to federal appeals court

Daniel L. Hatcher: Scott Walker confiscates millions from disabled and orphaned foster children

A Charles Dickens novel has come to life. Gov. Scott Walker’s administration has been partnering with a private company to search for foster children who are disabled or have dead birth parents — in order to take their money for state revenue. The state is even confiscating veterans’ benefits from foster children whose parents died in the military.

Contract documents obtained by public records request explain the practice. A 2011 contract signed with MAXIMUS Inc. shows that Wisconsin has collaborated with the company to maximize revenue obtained from foster children. In part of the contract focused on Milwaukee County, MAXIMUS has helped the state increase the number of children classified as disabled and to locate children with deceased birth parents — not to provide more services to the children, but so the state can take their resources.

More >> Daniel L. Hatcher: Scott Walker confiscates millions from disabled and orphaned foster children

Mother Teresa nuns back in India's adoption system

The Missionaries of Charity (MC) congregation has agreed to resume its service of giving children for adoption.

The congregation founded by St. Teresa of Kolkata, commonly known as Mother Teresa, discontinued giving babies from their orphanages for adoption in October 2015 after disagreeing with a new federal law that allowed single and divorced woman to adopt children.

More >> Mother Teresa nuns back in India's adoption system

Kansas Shops For Second Opinion On Welfare Reform's Impact On Foster Care Load

A University of Kansas study linked tighter welfare rules to a growing foster care load.

The state agency overseeing those programs backed those same new rules. Now, it’s hired a research team to question the findings of the KU study.

More >> Kansas Shops For Second Opinion On Welfare Reform's Impact On Foster Care Load

Riverside County will pay more than $11 million to settle claims against social services

Riverside County is set to pay nearly $11.4 million to settle two lawsuits that accused the county’s social services department of failing to protect a girl who became pregnant by her mother’s boyfriend and a toddler found holding her infant sibling’s mummified corpse.

The rape case involving “Jacquelyn H.,” who is now 15, will be settled for $10 million, Torrance-based attorney Roger Booth said Wednesday, Oct. 24.

More >> Riverside County will pay more than $11 million to settle claims against social services

Tuesday, November 06, 2018

In Denver child welfare cases, the father isn’t “John Doe” anymore

John Doe is not the father, at least not anymore.

An untold number of kids caught up in Denver’s child welfare system have had a father named John Doe, a practice that went on for decades and made it less likely for children to find permanent homes. When the dad is unknown, so is an entire side of the family that might otherwise step up to care for an abused child.

More >> In Denver child welfare cases, the father isn’t “John Doe” anymore

Illinois DCFS Agrees to Outside Inquiry at Psychiatric Hospital Where Children Have Reported Abuse

Under mounting pressure, the state child welfare agency agreed to a broad investigation, but the American Civil Liberties Union and other advocates said they will remain vigilant.

More >> Illinois DCFS Agrees to Outside Inquiry at Psychiatric Hospital Where Children Have Reported Abuse

'Dawnland' Documents Maine's Efforts To Reconcile Indian Child Removal

In 2012, the state of Maine began an effort to address a disturbing part of its history and present: the systematic removal of Indigenous children from their families and tribal communities through boarding schools and the foster care system. The documentary "Dawnland" follows the work of the Maine Wabanaki-State Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

More >> 'Dawnland' Documents Maine's Efforts To Reconcile Indian Child Removal




Adoption and children's rights advocates are rejecting the notion that advances in in-vitro fertilization have caused the collapse of adoption, as is being claimed.

The Telegraph reported Friday that amid figures showing that IVF success rates have risen from approximately 7 percent to around 30 percent, adoption is now competing against reproductive technologies, according to Anthony Douglas, chief executive of the Child and Family Court Advisory and Support Service. Some private clinics reportedly claim success rates of over 50 percent.


More >> Adoption Rates Not Collapsing Because of Greater IVF Success, Contrary to Claims, Advocates Say

Investigation finds government contractor violated policy while transporting immigrant children

When migrant children were separated from their parents this summer, a defense contractor hired by the federal government helped carry out the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy by transporting some to facilities. Special correspondent Aura Bogado from The Center for Investigative Reporting's Reveal team offers a look at one family’s experience and possible policy violations.

More >> Investigation finds government contractor violated policy while transporting immigrant children

Monday, November 05, 2018

Children in foster care at educational disadvantage: QUT study

Many of the 48,000 Australian children in foster care may struggle to reach national literacy and numeracy benchmarks, could be at higher risk than their peers of becoming disengaged with schooling, being suspended or expelled, and may struggle long-term with social and economic disadvantage, a QUT study has revealed.

More >> Children in foster care at educational disadvantage: QUT study

American Horror Story: U.S. Parents Separated from Children by Abusive Government Agencies

As the caravan of people marching toward America approaches, filled with children who will soon be “separated from their parents” for processing, get ready for a press assault with pictures of crying children and anguished reporting on the cruelty of it all. Yet, American parents grieve silently the loss of their children to out-of-control or inept child protective government agencies every single day. As I reported a few months ago, Michael Chambers, though cleared of any wrongdoing by a judge, is still without his daughter. Tens of thousands of American parents are in the same situation, but while the network news media trip over themselves to find stories of separation and trauma of Honduran children whose parents break our immigration laws, they are completely silent in the face of these American stories.

More >> American Horror Story: U.S. Parents Separated from Children by Abusive Government Agencies

Why desperate Chinese mother offered her triplets for adoption on social media site

A mother of triplets in eastern China offered her sons for adoption on a live-streaming social media platform after her gambling debt-laden husband abandoned her when the children were barely four weeks old.

Her husband, surnamed Zhao, returned after the incident was covered by local media, Zhejiang-based news site Thehour.cn reported on Monday. The mother’s account on the social media site TikTok was deleted, but screenshots of her posts offering the babies are still in circulation.


More >> Why desperate Chinese mother offered her triplets for adoption on social media site

Sunday, November 04, 2018

DCFS to stop sending kids to Chicago psychiatric hospital

The Illinois Department of Children and Family Services has temporarily stopped placing foster children in a Chicago psychiatric hospital where allegations of abuse have arisen.

A Chicago Tribune investigation uncovered several problems at Chicago Lakeshore Hospital. They include 16 complaints of patient abuse and neglect. Federal regulators also have threatened to cut off hospital funding if potential safety issues aren’t fixed by Nov. 30.

More >> DCFS to stop sending kids to Chicago psychiatric hospital

Australia’s Family Law Courts Are Crippling Families

Family law proceedings are crippling families financially and breaking them emotionally as overburdened systems struggle to cope with a rising backlog of cases, a new book has revealed.

Simone was five-years-old when her parents separated.

More >> Australia’s Family Law Courts Are Crippling Families

WHITE HOUSE: Trump Proclamation On Termination Of Parental Rights In Human Trafficking Through Denationalization Of Birthright Citizenship For National Adoption Month

Some Beverly Tran for you to chew on.

WHITE HOUSE: Trump Proclamation On Termination Of Parental Rights In Human Trafficking Through Denationalization Of Birthright Citizenship For National Adoption Month

MOTHER'S CHOICE Heartbreaking moment mum loses custody of son, 13, with leukaemia after she tried to stop him having chemotherapy

A heartbroken mum was ordered to hand over custody of her son to child protection services after she tried to stop him from undergoing chemotherapy.

More >> MOTHER'S CHOICE Heartbreaking moment mum loses custody of son, 13, with leukaemia after she tried to stop him having chemotherapy

Note: I would think that the kid needs his mom.

Fear of judgment, CPS prevents some addicted pregnant women from being honest

Along with St. James Healthcare in Butte, Missoula’s Community Medical Center recently received grant money to improve access to quality care for pregnant mothers and their babies.

While the new Montana Healthcare Foundation-funded programs developing across the state rely on standardized, prenatal screening for substance abuse, societal stigma and the fear of Child and Family Services may deter some pregnant women from being honest about their struggles with drug use.

More >> Fear of judgment, CPS prevents some addicted pregnant women from being honest

Immigrant children still being drugged at shelter despite judge’s order, lawyers say

The government is violating a federal judge’s order to stop medicating immigrant children held at a troubled Texas shelter without proper consent and to move the children to other housing, attorneys for the children allege in new court filings.

U.S. District Judge Dolly Gee ordered July 30 that immigrant children held at Shiloh Treatment Center could no longer be medicated with psychiatric drugs without the consent of a parent or court authorization and that any children not deemed a danger to themselves or others be moved to less restrictive housing. Gee also found the children should be allowed access to private phone calls.

More >> Immigrant children still being drugged at shelter despite judge’s order, lawyers say

Saturday, November 03, 2018

England adoption rates falling as IVF improves, says senior official

A drop in the rate of children being adopted is partly caused by improvements in IVF, the head of the public body representing children in care has said.

The success rates for fertility treatment are now nearly three in 10 (29%) for women under 35, almost three times higher than when the process was first developed in 1978.

More >> England adoption rates falling as IVF improves, says senior official

Illinois Child Welfare Agency Agrees to Stop Sending Children to Psychiatric Hospital Where Children Reported Abuse but Balks at Full Investigation

The state’s child welfare agency Friday agreed to stop sending children in its care to a Chicago psychiatric hospital where children have reported being sexually abused and assaulted, but said it would not seek the full independent investigation advocates had requested, setting up a possible court fight.

The decision by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services came one day after state lawmakers and the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois demanded the agency allow an outside expert to conduct a comprehensive investigation of Aurora Chicago Lakeshore Hospital on the city’s North Side.

More >> Illinois Child Welfare Agency Agrees to Stop Sending Children to Psychiatric Hospital Where Children Reported Abuse but Balks at Full Investigation

Former group home worker charged in teen's July drowning

A former group home worker who investigators say dropped Shaud Howell and two other teens off at Edgewater Beach the night Howell drowned has been indicted for involuntary manslaughter and two counts of endangering children.

According to investigators, 36-year-old Christina Coleman dropped the teens off at the beach, then left them there unsupervised. Lifeguards had already gone home for the night and the water was so rough that investigators say swimming was banned at the beach that day.

More >> Former group home worker charged in teen's July drowning

Kansas Shops For Second Opinion On Welfare Reform's Impact On Foster Care Load

A University of Kansas study linked tighter welfare rules to a growing foster care load.

The state agency overseeing those programs backed those same new rules. Now, it’s hired a research team to question the findings of the KU study.

More >> Kansas Shops For Second Opinion On Welfare Reform's Impact On Foster Care Load

Washington once again failing foster child with disabilities


Foster child M.D. had one constant in her turbulent childhood – a special bond with her sister. After the state sent M.D. to live with an abusive dad in Texas, the child was left a quadriplegic. On top of that, the state halted visits with her sister, which M.D's former foster parents say is "appalling."

More >> Washington once again failing foster child with disabilities

Trump encourages adoption: It ‘signals every child – born or unborn – is wanted and loved’



This week, President Donald Trump issued his second annual proclamation for National Adoption Month, hailing both adopting children and placing them for adoption as acts of love that enrich American society.

“Adoption is a blessing for all involved. It provides needed relief to birth parents, who may not, for whatever reason, be in a position to raise a child,” the president said Wednesday. “It fosters loving homes for children. It enables individuals to grow their families and share their love. And it fosters strong families, which are integral to ensuring strong communities and a resilient country.”

More >> Trump encourages adoption: It ‘signals every child – born or unborn – is wanted and loved’

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